Pleural Mesothelioma in a young male patient

https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2013.100

Authors

  • A. Voulgaridis Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • V. Apollonatou Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • D. Lykouras Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • A. Giannopoulos Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • M. Iliopoulou Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • K. Karkoulias Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • P. Kraniotis Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • C. Prokakis Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • M. Gkermpesi Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
  • K. Spiropoulos | spircos@upatras.gr Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.

Abstract

We present the case of a 33-year-old male patient suffering from lymphocytic pleural effusion, as a result of pleural mesothelioma. Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the pleura that is mainly caused by chronic exposure to asbestos fibers and more than 40 years of exposure are needed to develop the disease. Early studies on the relationship of asbestos and mesothelioma were issued in the 1960s. Fibers migrate from the parenchyma of the lung to the visceral pleura. It is widely known that asbestos is an oncogenic factor which can cause damage to DNA. A chest x-ray may reveal pleural effusion with or without pleural thickening, whereas a chest CT may also reveal pleural thickening, uniform and/or lobular. Specific tests, such as immunohistochemical staining, are used in order to help differential diagnosis. Extrapleural pneumonectomy is used as a therapeutic option which involves removal of the lung as well as both the visceral and parietal pleura, the affected part of the pericardium and diaphragm. Surgery should be followed up by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The surgery may lead to a mean survival rate of approximately 9-21 months. The case presented underlines that in the event of pleural effusion with a lymphocyte type physicians should consider the possibility of a pleural mesothelioma during differential diagnosis, even in relatively young patients.

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Published
2015-11-25
Info
Issue
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
Pleural mesothelioma, Lung cancer, Asbestos, Malignancy
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  • PDF: 310
How to Cite
Voulgaridis, A., V. Apollonatou, D. Lykouras, A. Giannopoulos, M. Iliopoulou, K. Karkoulias, P. Kraniotis, C. Prokakis, M. Gkermpesi, and K. Spiropoulos. 2015. “Pleural Mesothelioma in a Young Male Patient”. Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease 79 (2). https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2013.100.

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