Effects of stage-matched repeated individual behavioural counselling session (RIBCS) as an intervention for decreased and stopping smoking

  • Gopal Chawla Government Medical College and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8735-9774
  • Amrit Pal Kansal Government Medical College and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India.
  • Kunal Deokar | dkunal@live.in Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2603-1633
  • Nupur Abrol All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
  • Vishal Chopra Government Medical College and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India.
  • Pranav Ish Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.
  • Vinod Sharma Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.
  • Naresh Kumar Government Medical College and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India.
  • Komaldeep Bhatti Government Medical College and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India.

Abstract

We aimed to evaluate the effects of stage-matched repeated individual behavioural counselling (RIBCS) on the basis of the transtheoretical model (TTM) as an intervention to reduce and stop smoking. This study was conducted over a period of one year where all smokers presenting to a chest clinic in a tertiary centre were enrolled, each was classified on the basis of stage of readiness to change and underwent repeated counselling for a period of six months and each session was preceded and succeeded with filling of Fagerstorm test for nicotine dependence. Over the period of a year, 207 patients participated in this study, the mean age was 50.74±14.74 years; mean duration of tobacco use was 29.43±14.72 years; 64.3% were illiterate, 11.6% primary education, 14.1% were matric and while 10.1% were graduate. About 73% of smokers reported high level of nicotine dependence (FTND score >5/10). In the present study mean dependence score was 6.0±1.96; 44 (21.3%) were in pre-contemplation stage, 93 (44.9%) were in contemplation, 57 (27.5%) were in preparation and 13 (6.3%) were in action. The point prevalence excellence rate in follow up-I was 15%, follow up-II was 35.3% and follow up-III was 61.9% which was statistically significant. When we took both abstinence and reduction in smoking behaviour as one, p-value was <0.05. The point prevalence of abstinence rate (questionnaire validated) 1 month to 6 months was almost 4 times. Our intervention (RIBCS) succeeded in increasing the abstinence rates during the study period among smokers with a lower motivation to quit (pre-contemplators and contemplators) as well as those ready to quit (preparators). This is significant because of most existing smoking-cessation interventions target only motivated smokers, with few having a positive effect in smokers with a lower motivation to quit.

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Published
2020-04-07
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Issue
Section
Pneumology - Original Articles
Keywords:
behavioural science, psychosocial problems, smoking
Statistics
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How to Cite
Chawla, G., Kansal, A. P., Deokar, K., Abrol, N., Chopra, V., Ish, P., Sharma, V., Kumar, N., & Bhatti, K. (2020). Effects of stage-matched repeated individual behavioural counselling session (RIBCS) as an intervention for decreased and stopping smoking. Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease, 90(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2020.1208