Aortic stenosis calcium scoring in a racially mixed sample

  • Daniel Brito Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Igor Goykhman Department of Radiology, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Kevin Bryan Lo Department of Internal Medicine, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Yaser Alhamshari Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Jorge Luis Peñalver Department of Internal Medicine, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Francisco Aguilar Department of Internal Medicine, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2334-6915
  • Eduardo Quintero Department of Internal Medicine, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Aditi Kalla Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Evan Friend Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
  • Gregg S. Pressman | pressmang@einstein.edu Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0992-1805

Abstract

Aortic stenosis (AS) is common and increasing in prevalence as the population ages. Using computed tomography (CT) to quantify aortic valve calcification (AVC) it has been reported that men have greater degrees of calcification than women among subjects with severe AS. These data, however, were derived in largely Caucasian populations and have not been verified in non-Caucasian subjects. This retrospective study identified 137 patients with severe AS who underwent valve replacement and had CT scans within 6 months prior to surgery. AVC scores were compared between men and women, both in the entire sample and in racial subgroups. 52% of subjects were male and 62.8% were non-Caucasian. Mean AVC score for the entire cohort was 3062.08±2097.87 with a range of 428-13,089. Gender differences in aortic valve calcification were found to be statistically significant with an average AVC score of 3646±2422 in men and 2433±1453 in women (p=0.001). On multivariate analysis, gender remained significantly associated with AVC score both in the entire sample (p=0.014) and in the non-Caucasian subgroup (p=0.008). Mean AVA was significantly greater in males than females but this difference disappeared when AVA was indexed to BSA (p=0.719). AVA was not different between racial groups (p=0.369). In this research we observed that among subjects with severe AS men have higher AVC scores than women regardless of racial background. This is consistent with previous studies in predominantly Caucasian populations.

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Published
2020-10-02
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Section
Cardiology - Original Articles
Keywords:
Aortic valve calcium, severe aortic stenosis, computed tomography, gender differences
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How to Cite
Brito, D., Goykhman, I., Lo, K. B., Alhamshari, Y., Peñalver, J. L., Aguilar, F., Quintero, E., Kalla, A., Friend, E., & Pressman, G. S. (2020). Aortic stenosis calcium scoring in a racially mixed sample. Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease, 90(4). https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2020.1429