What happens when oral tuberculosis is not treated?

https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2007.499

Authors

  • A.E. Erbaycu | drerbaycu@yahoo.com Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Izmir Training of Research Hospital for Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Izmir, Turkey.
  • Z. Taymaz Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Izmir Training of Research Hospital for Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Izmir, Turkey.
  • F. Tuksavul Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Izmir Training of Research Hospital for Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Izmir, Turkey.
  • A. Afrashi Department Of Otorhinolaryngology, Izmir Training of Research Hospital for Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Izmir, Turkey.
  • S.Z. Güçlü Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Izmir Training of Research Hospital for Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Izmir, Turkey.

Abstract

Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the most important form of the disease, although infection may also occur by way of the intestinal tract, tonsils and skin. Oral lesions consist of persistent ulcers or granulomatous masses. A 50 year old man had been diagnosed “necrotising granulomatous inflammation†following a biopsy of a lesion on lower lip, 21 months before at a medical centre. A chest-X-ray had not been performed and he had not been given any advise in respect of treatment. He was admitted to the hospital with cough, sputum, weakness, weight loss and lesions on his lower lip. In radiology, it was detected that he had supraclavicular, submental, cervical, mediastinal lymphadenopathies, pulmonary infiltrations with cavities, thickening and roughness on left oropharengial tonsil, thickenning on inner parts of larynx and bilateral surrenal thickening. The biopsy of lesions on larynx, tonsil and epiglottis revealed “necrotising granulomatous inflammation†and histopathology supported TB infection. Sputum acid-fast bacilli was positive and culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Two months of combination treatment resulted in a gradual relief of the symptoms, radiological response, disappearing of neck swelling and healing of lesions on lip, tonsil and larynx. Although unusual oral cavity manifestations of TB are rare, clinicians should be aware of possible occurrance.

Dimensions

Altmetric

PlumX Metrics

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published
2016-02-03
Info
Issue
Section
TB Corner
Keywords:
Pulmonary tuberculosis, oral tuberculosis, lip, tonsil, larynx, epiglottis
Statistics
  • Abstract views: 396

  • PDF: 334
How to Cite
Erbaycu, A.E., Z. Taymaz, F. Tuksavul, A. Afrashi, and S.Z. Güçlü. 2016. “What Happens When Oral Tuberculosis Is Not Treated?”. Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease 67 (2). https://doi.org/10.4081/monaldi.2007.499.

Most read articles by the same author(s)